Sepia Saturday

Each week bloggers are invited to create a nostalgic or historic post based on a visual prompt. This week’s prompt shows women viewing a quilt. So I’m inspired to find photos with quilts, though other possibilities abound.

Source: Library of Congress

Harris & Ewing, photographer. (1933) PRIZE QUILT GIVEN MRS. ROOSEVELT. THE QUILT WHICH WON PRIZES AT THE WORLD FAIR IN CHICAGO IS PRESENTED TO MRS. ELEANOR ROOSEVELT BY E.J. CONDON. L.T. CONWAY VIEWS THE CEREMONY. BOTH MEN ARE CONNECTED WITH A MERCHANDISING CONCERN DOING BUSINESS ON A NATIONWIIDE SCALE. THE PRIZE WINNING QUILT WAS MADE BY MARGARET ROGERS CADEN OF LEXINGTON, KY. United States, 1933. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2016883417/.

Source: Library of Congress

Wolcott, M. P., photographer. (1938) Untitled photo, possibly related to: Housewives in Tygart Valley, West Virginia, have weekly group meetings in home economics. Here they are quilting. United States West Virginia Tygart Valley Randolph County, 1938. Sept. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2017799340/.

Library of Congress

Robinson, B. J. (1977) Fannie Lee Teals with her red, white, and blue American Revolution Bicentennial quilt. Georgia Tift County Tifton, 1977. August. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/awhbib000050/.

To see more Sepia Saturday inspired blog posts, click here. The link takes you to the hub.

About smkelly8

writer, teacher, movie lover, traveler, reader
This entry was posted in Blogging Challenge, Sepia Saturday and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Sepia Saturday

  1. La Nightingail says:

    Some good examples of quilts and quilting. I belonged to a quilting bee for a short time. It was fun and I could sew a fine enough seam, but it took a LOT of patience and I don’t have all that much! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. kathyfumc says:

    I enjoyed your selections and really enjoy looking at quilts, although I have done very little quilting myself. I’ve often wondered what it was like to quilt together as so many women did.

    Like

  3. Great overview of the artistic, social and cultural aspects of quilting — and a reminder that when women’s talents and energy were confined to domestic work, they nevertheless found ways to turn scraps of clots into lasting works of art.

    Like

  4. Barb Rogers says:

    These famous quilts are great to see, especially the last one!

    Like

  5. Mike Brubaker says:

    Do you think Mrs. Roosevelt used that quilt at the White House? I’d like to believe it’s still pulled out of the closet in the Lincoln bedroom whenever important guests stay over.

    Like

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