Sepia Saturday

Every week Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers with an image. The photo above is of early X-Ray recipients. My goodness, what’s going on with these contraptions? I feel for the woman on the left.

Here’s what I found on the Library of Congress website.

X-Ray photo. , 1896. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2006685434/.

To see more Sepia Saturday posts, click here.

Bain News Service, Publisher. Russian X-ray field van. , ca. 1910. [Between and Ca. 1915] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2014699968/.

Keystone View Company, Publisher. French field hospital, locating bullet with X-ray machine. France, None. [Meadville, pa. ; new york, n.y. ; chicago, ill. ; london, england: keystone view company, photographed between 1914 and 1918, published 1923] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2015652180/.

Delano, Jack, photographer. X-raying mice as part of work on disease resistance in the genetics laboratory at Iowa State College. Ames, Iowa. United States Ames. Ames Story County Iowa, 1942. May. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2017831359/.

About smkelly8

writer, teacher, movie lover, traveler, reader
This entry was posted in Blogging Challenge, History and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Sepia Saturday

  1. At first glance I thought they were wearing lamp shades, Interesting post.

    Like

  2. La Nightingail says:

    Informative post about the early uses of x-ray machines. In my own research I, too, discovered they were used much earlier than I had thought.

    Like

  3. kathyfumc says:

    That first photo set is so interesting. Fancy dress for an x-ray – proving it works through all those layers, I guess.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Wendy says:

    OMG – that first photo!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • smkelly8 says:

      I wonder about the background of it. The Library of Congress offers the basics (who, what, where, etc.) but no context. Is there more to this? Did she really get X-rayed in her dress, corset and all?

      Like

  5. mollyscanopy says:

    X-rays were a great medical breakthrough, but how scary that they were so casually used before health and safety awareness put a stop to it — as your first photo illustrates.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Just happened upon a television series called “London Hospital” which takes place roughly at the time of WWI — where they go into a good amount of detail about the greatly improved diagnostic ability due to early X-ray machines — but also the dangers! It’s interesting to see the mobile X-ray unit! I had no idea those existed!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.