Word of the Week

Roorback (n.) a defamatory falsehood published for political effect.

I ran across roorback while researching for my play about the first election in Chicago when women could vote and run for office.

Here’s the story of the etymology:

In the midst of the 1844 presidential campaign between James K. Polk and Henry Clay, a letter was published in a newspaper in Ithaca, New York, claiming that a reputable witness (one Baron von Roorback) had, while traveling in Tennessee, come across 43 slaves owned by Polk and branded with his initials. The letter caused an uproar that threatened to derail Polk’s campaign until it was discovered that the whole thing was a hoax supposedly perpetrated by the opposing party. Baron von Roorback didn’t even exist. The incident proved a political boomerang; Polk won the election and the name “roorback” became a byword for political dirty tricks.

Merriam-Webster. (n.d.). Roorback. In Merriam-Webster.com dictionary. Retrieved July 24, 2021, from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/roorback

About smkelly8

writer, teacher, movie lover, traveler, reader
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