Category Archives: words

Word of the Week

Nullah (n.): gully, ravine I’m reading Dervla Murphy’s Full Tilt and as she bikes through Afghanistan and Pakistan she rides along lots of nullahs. Reference Merriam-Webster. (n.d.). Nullah. In Merriam-Webster.com dictionary. Retrieved June 16, 2021, from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nullah

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Word of the Week

I ran across this word while reading Dervla Murphy’s Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle. purdah:  seclusion of women from public observation among Muslims and some Hindus especially in India (Merriam-Webster). I was surprised to learn that purdah … Continue reading

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Word of the Week

rent-seeking behavior (adv.) – getting paid for doing nothing that adds value. I’ve heard this day after day in the news lately. There were several rent seeking jobs with the Census last year, i.e. people sitting around with no work … Continue reading

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Word of the Week

Stagflation (n.) slow economic growth and relatively high unemployment—or economic stagnation—which is at the same time accompanied by rising prices (i.e. inflation). Stagflation can also be alternatively defined as a period of inflation combined with a decline in gross domestic product (GDP). Often … Continue reading

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Word of the Week

The Butterfield Effect (n.) – when someone . . . makes a statement that is laughably ludicrous on its face, yet it reveals what the speaker truly believes — no matter how dumb. Origin: named in honor of ace New … Continue reading

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Word of the Week

anon (n.), conflict, especially between characters in a drama. Agon comes from the Greek word agōn, which is translated with a number of meanings, among them “contest,” “competition at games,” and “gathering.” In ancient Greece, agons (also spelled “agones”) were contests held during … Continue reading

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Dayenu

I received a Lenten reflection email about dayenu and sought out some further explanation.

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Word of the Week

I ran across this in a book I’m reading Eric Hoffer’s True Believer. razzia (n.) – : a plundering and destructive incursion : FORAY, RAID Reference Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, s.v. “razzia,” accessed April 1, 2021, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/razzia.

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Word of the Week

foozle [ foo-zuhl ] verb (used with or without object) to bungle; play clumsily. What is the origin of foozle? Foozle “to bungle; play clumsily; bungle a stroke at golf,” perhaps comes from German dialect fuseln“to work badly, clumsily, hurriedly.” The verb foozle is somehow connected … Continue reading

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Word of the Week

palaver (n.) idle chatter, talk to beguile or charm. I ran across this in Bosses in Lusty Chicago. Reference ‘palaver’. (n.d.) Wordnik. Retrieved from https://www.wordnik.com/words/palaver on March 8, 2021.

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